stompoutmalaria
stompoutmalaria:

Weekly Awesome Mozambique: PCVs work to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS and malaria co-infection
All Health PCVs in Mozambique are funded by PEPFAR (the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief), and work primarily in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. Initiated in January 2012, Peace Corps/Mozambique malaria program aims to integrate malaria prevention activities into the HIV-focused activities that PCVs across the country are already do. The HIV/AIDS situation in Mozambique is precisely the reason that malaria activities must also continue to be scaled up: the dangerous effects of both diseases are only aggravated by each other.
Click here to learn about HIV/AIDS and malaria co-infection burden and what Peace Corps Volunteers are doing to combat it.
photo credit: photo credit: ILRI/Mann, Action for Global Health http://www.actionforglobalhealth.eu/blog/?p=928 

stompoutmalaria:

Weekly Awesome Mozambique: PCVs work to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS and malaria co-infection

All Health PCVs in Mozambique are funded by PEPFAR (the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief), and work primarily in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. Initiated in January 2012, Peace Corps/Mozambique malaria program aims to integrate malaria prevention activities into the HIV-focused activities that PCVs across the country are already do. The HIV/AIDS situation in Mozambique is precisely the reason that malaria activities must also continue to be scaled up: the dangerous effects of both diseases are only aggravated by each other.

Click here to learn about HIV/AIDS and malaria co-infection burden and what Peace Corps Volunteers are doing to combat it.

photo credit: photo credit: ILRI/Mann, Action for Global Health http://www.actionforglobalhealth.eu/blog/?p=928 

projectonewwa
projectonewwa:

Directioners, I ask you to take one moment from your scrolling and please read this. We have the opportunity to change several lives.
I’ll try to make this short and sweet. I, as well as many others of you, have been impacted by these 5 boys. They showed that ONE is significant. Without any single one of them, the band would not be where they are today. They would not be One Direction. Without all the millions of “ONE”s voting for them on the X Factor, tweeting, and buying their songs, they would not be where they are today and all the wonderful effects of their music would not have taken place.
They taught us that when ONEs come together, anything can happen. They taught me to dream big because ONE is important.
And so I have. I’m dreaming big and putting this before you: PROJECT ONE.
What are we gonna do?
Raise $1.7 million dollars.
A few nights ago it occurred to me how much potential comes together under the roof of a concert. Several thousands of people all under one roof. Anything could happen even if each person just gave one dollar.
 At my show alone, there will be 80,000 people in the crowds. So I got curious and did the math at what the seating capacity for all the stadiums/dates on the North America leg of the WWA tour would be. The results? 1,709,269. Not including unaccounted for floor seating. THAT IS ALMOST TWO MILLION PEOPLE. 
How are we gonna do that?!
Giving $1.
Let’s say each of these 1.7 million people scrounged up $1. Simple math, we’d have $1.7 MILLION DOLLARS. It seems like a lot of money, but all it would take is all of us going to the Where We Are Tour to just give ONE dollar. 
What’s the money for?
Mosquito nets.
I’m sure we’ve all seen the boys videos that were in partner with Comic Relief where they went to Africa and first hand saw the effects Malaria can cause. Thanks to Red Nose Day, the boys were able to help raise tons of money thanks to us donating and texting in. But I want to keep on going. I want everyone to be involved. 
After doing some research, I discovered that there is a simple prevention method to Malaria. Mosquito nets. Each Mosquito Net costs $10 to purchase and deliver to Africa.
How many mosquito nets can we buy?
Assuming the minimum funds we get is $1 per concert attendee we are back at $1.7 million. Divided by 10, that’s 170,926! That’s more than enough to cover not just one, but SEVERAL communities in Africa!
THAT’S THOUSANDS UPON THOUSANDS OF LIVES SAVED. 
All because WE, (every ONE) of us, decided to make this tour make an impact and show those boys they taught us to make a difference and follow your dreams.
HOW CAN I HELP?
This project needs to be talked about. Tumblr’d about. Tweeted about. Let’s get the boys to know what we are trying to do! Practically, we will need booths and donation set ups at each of the tour dates and we would have to work with the tour agency to get this to happen. 
They may not listen to one of my phone calls. But they WILL listen to every single ONE of us working together to make this happen. 
Let’s SIGNAL BOOST this like CRAZY! We still have several months before the North America leg of the tour. Let’s use them to our advantage!
The official hashtag is #ProjectOneWWA! 
Send this link to your friends. REBLOG THIS POST. SPREAD THE WORD!!
I know that if any fandom can do this, it’s ours. We helped the boys get where they are because of social media, let’s help them go even further!! Please, please, please help this project see the light of day. I know we can make a change.
Even if you aren’t a Directioner, let’s help make a difference in this world because it’s the right thing to do. Lives are at stake.
Thanks for your time!!

projectonewwa:

Directioners, I ask you to take one moment from your scrolling and please read this. We have the opportunity to change several lives.

I’ll try to make this short and sweet. I, as well as many others of you, have been impacted by these 5 boys. They showed that ONE is significant. Without any single one of them, the band would not be where they are today. They would not be One Direction. Without all the millions of “ONE”s voting for them on the X Factor, tweeting, and buying their songs, they would not be where they are today and all the wonderful effects of their music would not have taken place.

They taught us that when ONEs come together, anything can happen. They taught me to dream big because ONE is important.

And so I have. I’m dreaming big and putting this before you: PROJECT ONE.

What are we gonna do?

Raise $1.7 million dollars.

A few nights ago it occurred to me how much potential comes together under the roof of a concert. Several thousands of people all under one roof. Anything could happen even if each person just gave one dollar.

 At my show alone, there will be 80,000 people in the crowds. So I got curious and did the math at what the seating capacity for all the stadiums/dates on the North America leg of the WWA tour would be. The results? 1,709,269. Not including unaccounted for floor seating. THAT IS ALMOST TWO MILLION PEOPLE

How are we gonna do that?!

Giving $1.

Let’s say each of these 1.7 million people scrounged up $1. Simple math, we’d have $1.7 MILLION DOLLARS. It seems like a lot of money, but all it would take is all of us going to the Where We Are Tour to just give ONE dollar. 

What’s the money for?

Mosquito nets.

I’m sure we’ve all seen the boys videos that were in partner with Comic Relief where they went to Africa and first hand saw the effects Malaria can cause. Thanks to Red Nose Day, the boys were able to help raise tons of money thanks to us donating and texting in. But I want to keep on going. I want everyone to be involved. 

After doing some research, I discovered that there is a simple prevention method to Malaria. Mosquito nets. Each Mosquito Net costs $10 to purchase and deliver to Africa.

How many mosquito nets can we buy?

Assuming the minimum funds we get is $1 per concert attendee we are back at $1.7 million. Divided by 10, that’s 170,926! That’s more than enough to cover not just one, but SEVERAL communities in Africa!

THAT’S THOUSANDS UPON THOUSANDS OF LIVES SAVED. 

All because WE, (every ONE) of us, decided to make this tour make an impact and show those boys they taught us to make a difference and follow your dreams.

HOW CAN I HELP?

This project needs to be talked about. Tumblr’d about. Tweeted about. Let’s get the boys to know what we are trying to do! Practically, we will need booths and donation set ups at each of the tour dates and we would have to work with the tour agency to get this to happen. 

They may not listen to one of my phone calls. But they WILL listen to every single ONE of us working together to make this happen. 

Let’s SIGNAL BOOST this like CRAZY! We still have several months before the North America leg of the tour. Let’s use them to our advantage!

The official hashtag is #ProjectOneWWA

Send this link to your friends. REBLOG THIS POST. SPREAD THE WORD!!

I know that if any fandom can do this, it’s ours. We helped the boys get where they are because of social media, let’s help them go even further!! Please, please, please help this project see the light of day. I know we can make a change.

Even if you aren’t a Directioner, let’s help make a difference in this world because it’s the right thing to do. Lives are at stake.

Thanks for your time!!

stompoutmalaria
stompoutmalaria:

Malaria Boot Camp, day 5: Participants visited three local health structures to learn about the work and challenges associated with malaria interventions in Senegal. Doctors, mid-wives, and nurses were interviewed by participants to learn about accessibility, facilities, training, and attitudes in the health system. Photo: participants visit a Health Hut to talk  to Penda Jakatou in Tawa Fall.

Remember, those who want to volunteer should know how malaria works. 

stompoutmalaria:

Malaria Boot Camp, day 5: Participants visited three local health structures to learn about the work and challenges associated with malaria interventions in Senegal. Doctors, mid-wives, and nurses were interviewed by participants to learn about accessibility, facilities, training, and attitudes in the health system. Photo: participants visit a Health Hut to talk  to Penda Jakatou in Tawa Fall.

Remember, those who want to volunteer should know how malaria works. 

stompoutmalaria
stompoutmalaria:

Weekly Awesome Zambia: Natural Mosquito Repellent Production
A team of two Peace Corps Volunteers and two Host Country National Counterparts from rural communities developed, produced and tested various methods for the prevention of malaria via application of natural soaps and lotions at an Appropriate Technology Workshop held in Mansa, Luapula Province, Zambia, 22/05/2012 – 27/05/2012. The team developed the idea for their products by setting a series of design requirements to ensure that the repellents would be affordable, accessible, culturally compatible, and effective. This was accomplished through researching ICE materials and interviews with HCNs that live in the affected communities.
View the entire report here

It’s worth trying out simple prevention methods. 

stompoutmalaria:

Weekly Awesome Zambia: Natural Mosquito Repellent Production

A team of two Peace Corps Volunteers and two Host Country National Counterparts from rural communities developed, produced and tested various methods for the prevention of malaria via application of natural soaps and lotions at an Appropriate Technology Workshop held in Mansa, Luapula Province, Zambia, 22/05/2012 – 27/05/2012. The team developed the idea for their products by setting a series of design requirements to ensure that the repellents would be affordable, accessible, culturally compatible, and effective. This was accomplished through researching ICE materials and interviews with HCNs that live in the affected communities.

View the entire report here

It’s worth trying out simple prevention methods. 

stompoutmalaria

stompoutmalaria:

Weekly Awesome Tanzania: Dream Banners

Dream Banners, an activity created by Malaria No More,  is one way that Peace Corps Volunteers are engaging their community members in malaria discussions and awareness and encouraging young children to sleep under a long-lasting insecticide treated bednet (LLIN).  Students talk about their future ambitions and draw pictures.  After her students drew their Dream Banners, Stephanie explained how preventing malaria helps students stay healthy to go to school and work hard to accomplish their dreams. The students enjoyed the activity and brought their banners home to share the importance of malaria prevention with their families.

Read how PCV Stephanie Gaffney and her counter part Mathayo Msosa used Dream Banners to teach local primary school students about malaria here.

Bring Hope!